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Comparison of ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization versus anatomical landmarks in pediatric critically ill patients: a prospective study

By
Alfredo Carlos Rodríguez-Portelles ,
Alfredo Carlos Rodríguez-Portelles

Hospital Padre Carollo, Quito, Ecuador

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Arianna Maité Céspedes Rómulo ,
Arianna Maité Céspedes Rómulo

Universidad de las Américas (UDLA), Quito, Ecuador

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David Pascual Rojas Flores ,
David Pascual Rojas Flores

Hospital General Regional No. 1 Querétaro del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Querétaro, México

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Reynaldo Carvajal Choque ,
Reynaldo Carvajal Choque

Hospital Petrolero, La Paz, Bolivia

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Francia Pérez Arellano ,
Francia Pérez Arellano

Hospital Gineco Obstétrico Pediátrico de Nueva Aurora “Luz Elena Arismendi”, Quito, Ecuador

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Evelin Resplandor Millan ,
Evelin Resplandor Millan

Hospital General del Instituto Ecuatoriano de Seguridad Social Quito Sur, Quito, Ecuador

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Romer Guachichulca ,
Romer Guachichulca

Hospital de Especialidades Carlos Andrade Marín, Quito, Ecuador

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Isaura Jaimes ,
Isaura Jaimes

Hospital General del Instituto Ecuatoriano de Seguridad Social Quito Sur, Quito, Ecuador

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Marielena Vivas Fernández ,
Marielena Vivas Fernández

Hospital Gineco Obstétrico Pediátrico de Nueva Aurora “Luz Elena Arismendi”, Quito, Ecuador

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Abstract

Introduction: Central venous catheterization is a common procedure in critically ill pediatric patients, but its accurate and safe performance remains a challenge.
Objective: To determine if ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization improves the first-attempt success rate and reduces the risk of complications compared with the landmark-based approach in pediatric critically ill patients.
Methods: A prospective study was carried out that included 100 critical pediatric patients, divided into two groups: ultrasound-guided catheterization (n=43) and anatomical references (n=47). Demographic and clinical data were collected, variables of interest were recorded, and logistic regression analysis adjusted for patient age, access site, and operator was performed.
Results: Ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization showed a significantly higher first-attempt success rate compared with anatomic references (81.4% vs. 57.4%, p<0.05). In addition, a significant reduction in procedural complications was observed in the ultrasound-guided group compared to the anatomical reference group (4.7% vs. 12.8%, p<0.05).
Conclusions: The use of ultrasound as a guide improves the success rate in the first attempt and reduces the risk of complications during the procedure. These findings highlight the importance of considering ultrasound-guided catheterization as a preferred strategy in the management of critically ill pediatric patients requiring central venous access.

How to Cite

1.
Rodríguez-Portelles AC, Céspedes Rómulo AM, Rojas Flores DP, Carvajal Choque R, Pérez Arellano F, Resplandor Millan E, Guachichulca R, Jaimes I, Vivas Fernández M. Comparison of ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization versus anatomical landmarks in pediatric critically ill patients: a prospective study. Salud, Ciencia y Tecnología [Internet]. 2023 Aug. 3 [cited 2024 Apr. 12];3:522. Available from: https://revista.saludcyt.ar/ojs/index.php/sct/article/view/522

The article is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. Unless otherwise stated, associated published material is distributed under the same licence.

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