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Self-efficacy and academic procrastination in a sample of university students: A correlational study

By
Giovanna Rocio Pizarro-Osorio ,
Giovanna Rocio Pizarro-Osorio

Universidad Nacional de Cañete. Cañete, Perú

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Marleni Mendoza-Zuñiga ,
Marleni Mendoza-Zuñiga

Universidad Nacional de Cañete. Cañete, Perú

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Betsabe Lilia Pizarro-Osorio ,
Betsabe Lilia Pizarro-Osorio

Universidad Nacional de Cañete. Cañete, Perú

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Guido Raul Larico-Uchamaco ,
Guido Raul Larico-Uchamaco

Universidad Nacional de Cañete. Cañete, Perú

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Maribel Mamani-Roque ,
Maribel Mamani-Roque

Universidad Nacional del Altiplano. Puno, Perú

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Milton Raul Mamani-Roque ,
Milton Raul Mamani-Roque

Universidad Nacional de San Agustín de Arequipa. Arequipa, Perú

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Roberto Anacleto Aguilar-Velasquez ,
Roberto Anacleto Aguilar-Velasquez

Universidad Nacional del Altiplano. Puno, Perú

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Tatiana Carmen Huamani-Calloapaza ,
Tatiana Carmen Huamani-Calloapaza

Universidad Nacional Amazónica de Madre de Dios. Puerto Maldonado, Perú

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Ronald Pachacutec-Quispicho ,
Ronald Pachacutec-Quispicho

Universidad Nacional Amazónica de Madre de Dios. Puerto Maldonado, Perú

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Abstract

Introduction: in the university context, self-efficacy extends beyond mere confidence in a student's academic abilities; it is considered a fundamental pillar that impacts their academic performance, intrinsic motivation, ability to face challenges, and psychological well-being. However, its absence could trigger a series of negative effects on the student and their educational experience.
Objective: to determine if self-efficacy is significantly related to academic procrastination in a sample of students from a public university in Peru.
Methods: quantitative research, non-experimental design, and cross-sectional correlational type. The sample consisted of 185 students, estimated through probabilistic sampling. The instruments used for data collection were the General Self-Efficacy Scale and the Academic Procrastination Scale, both with adequate psychometric properties.
Results: the students were characterized by moderate levels of self-efficacy and low levels of academic procrastination. Additionally, it was determined that the Spearman's rho correlation coefficient for the variables of self-efficacy and academic procrastination was -0.687 (p <0.05). This means that as the belief in one's own ability to succeed academically increases, the tendency to postpone academic tasks decreases.
Conclusions: self-efficacy is significantly related to academic procrastination in a sample of students from a public university in Peru. This finding underscores the importance of implementing interventions to strengthen students' self-efficacy while strategically addressing academic procrastination.

Objective: to determine if self-efficacy is significantly related to academic procrastination in a sample of students from a public university in Peru.

Methods: quantitative research, non-experimental design, and cross-sectional correlational type. The sample consisted of 185 students, estimated through probabilistic sampling. The instruments used for data collection were the General Self-Efficacy Scale and the Academic Procrastination Scale, both with adequate psychometric properties.

Results: the students were characterized by moderate levels of self-efficacy and low levels of academic procrastination. Additionally, it was determined that the Spearman's rho correlation coefficient for the variables of self-efficacy and academic procrastination was -0.687 (p <0.05). This means that as the belief in one's own ability to succeed academically increases, the tendency to postpone academic tasks decreases.

Conclusions: self-efficacy is significantly related to academic procrastination in a sample of students from a public university in Peru. This finding underscores the importance of implementing interventions to strengthen students' self-efficacy while strategically addressing academic procrastination.

How to Cite

1.
Pizarro-Osorio GR, Mendoza-Zuñiga M, Pizarro-Osorio BL, Larico-Uchamaco GR, Mamani-Roque M, Mamani-Roque MR, Aguilar-Velasquez RA, Huamani-Calloapaza TC, Pachacutec-Quispicho R. Self-efficacy and academic procrastination in a sample of university students: A correlational study. Salud, Ciencia y Tecnología [Internet]. 2024 Jun. 17 [cited 2024 Jul. 15];4:1057. Available from: https://revista.saludcyt.ar/ojs/index.php/sct/article/view/1057

The article is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. Unless otherwise stated, associated published material is distributed under the same licence.

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