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Contrasting Educational Strategies in Health Sciences vs. Non-Health Sciences Disciplines: Insights from Scopus Database

By
Daniel Santos Silva-Nieves ,
Daniel Santos Silva-Nieves

Universidad Cesar Vallejo. Lima, Perú

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Arthur Giuseppe Serrato-Cherres ,
Arthur Giuseppe Serrato-Cherres

Universidad Cesar Vallejo. Lima, Perú

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Judith Marita Soplin Rojas ,
Judith Marita Soplin Rojas

Universidad Cesar Vallejo. Lima, Perú

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Arturo César Pomacaja Flores ,
Arturo César Pomacaja Flores

Universidad Cesar Vallejo. Lima, Perú

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Pamela Jennifer Sullca-Tapia ,
Pamela Jennifer Sullca-Tapia

Universidad Cesar Vallejo. Lima, Perú

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Abstract

Introduction: Education plays a pivotal role in shaping the knowledge, skills, and competencies of individuals across various fields of study.
Aim: to contrast educational strategies used in health sciences with those employed in disciplines unrelated to health.
Methods: The present study is primarily based on primary literature, mostly academic articles, indexed in the Scopus database. The aim of using this method is to quantify the documents referring to bibliometric analysis as a working tool in two categories for subsequent analysis: non-health-related categories (NH) and health-related categories (H). The groups were examined separately with a productivity and citation analysis to assess their impact.
Results: During this period, there is a gradual increase in the number of documents in both groups. In the NH group, the number of documents increased from 907 in 2013 to 2422 in 2022. Meanwhile, in the H group, the number of documents increased from 192 in 2013 to 490 in 2022. Overall, there is an increase in the number of documents in both groups over time, with the NH group exhibiting a higher number of documents compared to the H group in each year. it is observed that both groups have a low level of international collaboration, although the NH group shows a slightly higher proportion. On the other hand, the H group exhibits a higher proportion of national collaboration and a lower lack of collaboration compared to the NH group. Both groups demonstrate a high level of institutional collaboration. A greater heterogeneity is observed in areas other than health.
Conclusions: This study has provided an integrated view of research in health-related and non-health-related categories. The results emphasize the importance of promoting international collaboration and strengthening collaboration networks in both groups. Furthermore, key thematic areas in the field of nursing education, healthcare and clinical practice, human behavior and psychology, and teaching and learning have been identified. These findings can be useful for researchers, educators, and healthcare professionals interested in addressing these topics in the context of training and clinical practice, as well as for those seeking to understand current trends and interrelationships in the field of education.

How to Cite

1.
Silva-Nieves DS, Serrato-Cherres AG, Soplin Rojas JM, Pomacaja Flores AC, Sullca-Tapia PJ. Contrasting Educational Strategies in Health Sciences vs. Non-Health Sciences Disciplines: Insights from Scopus Database. Salud, Ciencia y Tecnología [Internet]. 2023 Jun. 19 [cited 2024 Jun. 20];3:439. Available from: https://revista.saludcyt.ar/ojs/index.php/sct/article/view/439

The article is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. Unless otherwise stated, associated published material is distributed under the same licence.

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